The Making of a Scientist Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English

The Making of a Scientist Class 10 Extra Questions & Answers are available here. Class 10 English The Making of a Scientist extra questions and answers are prepared by our expert teachers. All these questions are divided into two or three sections. They are short type questions answers, long type question answers and extract based questions. Learning these questions will help you to score excellent marks in the board exams.

The Making of a Scientist Extra Questions and Answers

Short Answer Type Questions

1. Which project did Albright submit in his eighth grade? Why did he win?

Answer: For his eighth grade project, he tried to find the cause of a viral disease that killed all monarch caterpillars every few years. He thought it all happened because of a hectic and tried raising caterpillars in the presence of beetles but he did not get any results, but he went ahead and showed his experiments and trials arid won a prize.

2. ’Richard was the focus of his mother’s attention”. Compose a thesis on this.

Answer: Richard was three years old when he lost his father. Then he became the whole life of hi, mother, Ins mother was his only companion tint he started scout mythic brought home file tithe for in. At night they just did the things together. Ili-, mother encouraged his interest in learning. She took him on trips, bought loin telescopes.  Cameras and their equipment-h that him other ways, It motives who brought him the book ‘The rave Kit-larch X”. Thus lit let row focus on’ twig tether’ attention.

3. What made in light straight. A grade pit dint in it-hoot?

Answer: Ebright was that lampion itchier and pubis types her and good comfits and all-around outdoor person. He was an expert photographer of nature and stain tibia exhibit & had won many prizes in science fairs at the county level. He proved a lot of things about met/webs and other butterflies. He had already read the blueprint of DNA. All these made him straights. A grade student in school.

4Comment on the role of Mr. Weathered in Albright’s life,
Or
Who were the important people in Albright’s life? Why

Answer: Ebright’s mother who encouraged him as a child and Dr. Frederick A. Urquhart O. had inspired him to study about butterflies were quite important in Albright’s life, Also, Ridded A Weathered, Albright’s Social Studies teacher opened Albright’s mind to new ideas and praised him for his handwork and indomitable spirit.

5. Why did Ebright lose interest in tagging butterflies?

Answer: Albright lost interest in tagging butterflies because it was a tedious work that did not provide much feedback.

6. Identify four values which Richard Ebright projected as a man of substance.

Answer: Ebright was not only a good scientist but also a keen observer. He was a good sea champion debater and public speaker. He was an expert photographer, particularly of woo and scientific exhibits.

7. Which project of Ebright won first prize in the county science fair?

Answer: Ebright didn’t win anything at his first science fair, thereby realizing that actual experiments alone worked. Later, he started winning prizes. Ebright with his scientist friend first built a device that showed that the tiny gold spots on a monarch pupa were producing a hormone necessary for the butterfly’s full development. This project won the first prize in the county science fair and third prize in zoology in the International science fair.

8. What all hobbies did Albright develop in kindergarten?

Answer: As a child, Ebright had a driving curiosity. He was interested in learning new things. He was a good in studies and earned top grades in the class. He also collected rocks, fossils and coins. He became an eager astronomer too.

9. How did Richard’s mother helped him to become a scientist?
Or
How did Ebright’s mother help in his learning?

Answer: Ebright had a driving curiosity and a bright brain — essential ingredients for becoming a scientist. His mother encouraged him to learn more. She exposed him to the world around him by taking him to trips, bought him books, telescope, microscope, cameras, mounting materials and other equipment, which helped him in his learning.

10. “Science shows a connection between structure and function.” Show this to be so, for the spots Albright saw on Monarch pupas.

Answer: Ebright grew cells from a monarch’s wing to show that cells could divide and develop into a normal butterfly wing scales only if they were fed with the hormones from the gold spots, Later, he identified the chemical structure of the hormone and found how cells can read the blueprints of its DNA.

11How can Albright’s theory of cell life be a revolution in the medical field if it is proved correct

Answer: Ebright identified the chemical structure of the gold spot hormone and found so cells can read the blueprint of its DNA. To further test his theory, he began doing experiments’ if it proves correct it will be a big step towards understanding the process of life. It might lead to new ideas for preventing some types of cancer and diseases.

12. What were the factors which contributed to making Ebright a scientist?
Or
What are the essential qualities for becoming a scientist, according to Albright’s teacher?

Answer: Sharp brain, d y observant, anal tic mind, driving curiosity, the keen interest in the subject and strong will for the right cause are some of the essentials for the making of a scientist. He should not run after prizes, have a competitive spirit but not in a bad sense.

13. What results are expected if Richard Ebright’s theory is proved correct?

Answer: If Richard Ebright’s theory proves to be correct, it will be a big step towards understanding the processes of life. It might lead to new ideas for preventing some types of cancer and other diseases.

14. Why did Richard Ebright tag a flock of butterflies?
Or
Why did Richard Ebright start a project of tagging the butterflies?

Answer: Once Ebright’s mother bought him a book .’The Travels of Monarch X’. At the end of the hook, the writer Dr. A. Urquhart had invited readers to help him in the study of butterfly migration by tagging them. So he started tagging the butterflies.

15. Describe Richard Ebright’s childhood.
Or
How did Ebright spend his time in Pennsylvania?

Answer: Ebright grew up north of Reading, Pennsylvania. He was the only child of his parents. His father died when he was in third grade. As a child, he was good in studies and also collected rocks, fossils and coins.

16. How did the hook become a turning point in Richard Ebright’s life?

Answer:  Once his mother bought the book. ‘The Travels of Monarch X’. At the end of the book, Dr. A. Urquhart had invited readers to help him study the migration of monarch butterflies by tagging them. This became a turning point in his life.

17. Mention any two of Ebright’s contributions to the world of science.

Answer: He carried experiments to prove successfully that hormone produced by the gold spots of a pupa is responsible for the growth and formation of butterfly-wings. He also discovered how a cell could read the blueprint of its DNA that controls heredity.

18. To which field of science has Richard H. Ebright contributed? 

Answer: Richard H. Ebright is one of the leading scientists. He had been interested in science since his boyhood. He has contributed significantly to Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

19. What were the hobbies of Ebright in his childhood?

Answer: Ebright’s hobby was collecting things. Ebright was fascinated by butterflies. He started collecting butterflies in kindergarten. He also collected rocks, fossils and coins. He also became a star-gazer and an eager astronomer.

20. How did Ebright’s mother help him in his hunger for learning?

Answer: Ebright’s mother would find work for Richer if he had nothing to do. She found learning tasks for him. He had a great hunger for learning. He earned top grades in school. By the time he was in second grade, he had collected 25 species of butterflies.

21. Which book did Ebright’s mother give him? How did this book change his life?

Answer: One day Ebright’s mother gave him a children’s book. That book was ‘The Travels of Monarch X’. It described how monarch butterflies migrate to Central America. This book fascinated him. This book stimulated his interest in butterflies. He devoted his time to the study of butterflies and won many prizes. In this way, this book changed his life.

22. What did Ebright realize when he started tagging butterflies?

Answer: Ebright started tagging monarch butterflies. He realized that chasing the butterflies one by one won’t enable him to each many. So he decided to raise a flock of butterflies.

23. How did Ebright raise a flock of butterflies?

Answer: Ebright would catch a female monarch and take her eggs. He would raise them in his basement, from egg to caterpillar to pupa to adult butterfly. Then he would tag the butterflies’ s’ ‘ and let them.

24. Why did Ebright begin to lose interest in tagging butterflies?

Answer: Ebright began to lose interest in tagging butterflies. The reason was that there was no feedback. He was a little disappointed as only two butterflies had been recaptured. And they had been found not more than seventy-five miles from where he lived.

25. What happened with Ebright when he entered a county science fair for the first time?

Answer: He entered a county science fair Ebright for the first time. His entries were slides of frog tissues. But he did not win any prize.

26. What did Ebright realize when he did not win any prize in the county science fair?

Answer: He realised that the winners had tried to do real experiments. So he decided to do further research in his favorite field, that is, insects on which he had already been doing work.

27. What happened when Ebright wrote to Dr. Urquhart for ideas?

Answer: Ebright wrote to Dr. Urquhart for ideas. In reply, the famous scientist gave him many suggestions for experiments. These experiments kept Ebright busy all through high school. He also won many prizes in the county and international science fairs.

28. Why do the viceroy butterflies imitate the monarch butterflies?

Answer: In one of his science fair projects, he tested the theory that viceroy butterflies imitate monarchs. He reached the conclusion that viceroys look like monarchs because birds do not find monarchs tasty. They like to eat viceroy butterflies. By copying monarchs, the viceroys escape being eaten by birds.

29. Which simple question led to the discovery of an unknown insect hormone?

Answer: In his second year in high school, Ebright’s research led to his discovery of an unknown insect hormone. Indirectly, it led to his new theory on the life of cells. He tried to answer a very simple question: “What is the purpose of the twelve tiny gold spots on a monarch pupa?’

30. What did Ebright discover about the spots on a monarch butterfly’s pupa?

Answer: Ebright tried to find out what was the purpose of the twelve tiny gold spots on a monarch butterfly’s pupa. To find the answer Ebright and another student built a device that showed that the spots were producing a hormone. It was necessary for the butterfly’s full development.

31. What idea did Ebright get when he was looking at the X-ray photos of cells?

Answer: One day, Ebright was seeing the X-ray photos of the chemical structure of cells. He got the idea for his new theory about cell life. Those photos provided him with the answer to one of biology’s puzzles: how the cell can ‘read’ the blueprint of its DNA.

32. How did Richard Ebright excite the scientific world at the age of twenty-two?

Answer: Richard Ebright was just twenty-two when he ‘excited’ the scientific world with a new theory. It was on how cells worked. Ebright and his college room-mate explained the theory in an article in the ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Science’. It was the first time that this famous scientific journal had ever published the work of college students.

33. “… There was one thing I could do —collect things.” What did Richard Ebright do in his childhood?

Answer: Richard Ebright was the only child. “There wasn’t much could do there. But there was one thing I could do — collect things,” said he. So he did. While still in kindergarten, he started collecting butterflies. By the time he was in the second grade, he had collected all 25 species of butterflies found around his hometown. He also collected rocks, fossils and coins. He sometimes did star-gazing all night.

34. “Richie was my whole life after his father died …,” said Richard’s mother. Describe Richard Ebright’s relationship with his mother.

Answer: Richard was in third grade when his father died. He was her mother’s whole life and her only companion until he started school. She and Richard spent almost every evening at the dining table. She found work for him and Richard wanted to learn. His mother encouraged his interest in learning.

35. How did Richard Ebright’s mother be a source of inspiration and encouragement in his quest for learning?

Answer: Richard Ebright was fortunate enough to have a highly helping and encouraging mother. She compensated the early loss of his father. She encouraged his interest in learning. She took him on trips, bought him telescopes, microscopes, cameras, mounting materials and other equipment. She found work for him and helped him in learning things and in many other ways.

36. What book opened the world of science to the eager young collector, Richard Ebright?

Answer: Richard Ebright was fond of collecting things. By the time he was in the second grade, he had collected all twenty-five species of butterflies found around his hometown. But the book that opened the world of science to the eager young collector was The Travels of Monarch X. It was a children’s book gifted to him by his mother. The book described how monarch butterflies migrated to Central America.

37. Why and where did Richard Ebright send the tagged butterflies?

Answer: At the end of the book, The Travels of Monarch X, readers were invited to help study monarch butterflies’ migration. They were asked to tag butterflies for research by Dr. Urquhart. Soon, Richard Ebright was attaching light adhesive tags to the wings of monarch butterflies. He used to send them to Dr. Urquhart for his research work.

38. How did Ebright’s basement become home to thousands of monarch butterflies?

Answer: Richard Ebright used to send tagged monarch butterflies to Dr. Urquhart for his research work. Chasing butterflies one by one was difficult and he couldn’t catch many. So, he decided to raise some of the butterflies in his basement. He would catch a monarch butterfly, take her eggs and raise them. Then, he would tag the butterflies’ wings and let them go. So, his basement became home to thousands of monarch butterflies.

39. When and how did Richard Ebright get a hint of what real science is?

Answer: Richard Ebright was in seventh grade when he got a hint of what real science was. Actually, he entered a county science fair — and lost. He didn’t get anything while everybody else had won. It was a very sad feeling for young Ebright. His entry was slides of frog tissues. He showed them under a microscope. He realised that the winners had tried to do real experiments. On the other hand, he failed because he simply made a neat display.

40. Who was Dr. Frederick A Urquhart? Why did Richard Ebright look to him for fresh ideas?

Answer: Dr. Frederick A Urquhart was a scientist and teacher at the University of Toronto, Canada. He was doing research on butterfly migrations. Ebright sent him many tagged butterflies for his research work. Richard Ebright looked to him for fresh ideas and suggestions. Dr. Urquhart sent many suggestions for experiments which helped Richard Ebright in winning many prizes in County and International Science Fairs.

41. Why do viceroy butterflies copy monarch butterflies? What reasons did Richard Ebright give in this regard?

Answer: One of Richard Ebright’s projects was to test the theory that viceroy butterflies copied monarch butterflies. Viceroys looked like monarchs because monarchs didn’t taste good to birds. Viceroy butterflies, on the other hand, tasted good to birds. So, they try to copy and look like them to protect themselves from birds.

42. Were twelve tiny gold spots on a monarch pupa just ornamental? What did Richard Ebright prove in this regard? What honors did this project bring to Richard Ebright?

Answer: Many thought that the twelve gold spots on a monarch pupa were just ornamental. But Dr. Urquhart didn’t believe it. Richard built a device that showed that the spots were producing a very important hormone. That hormone was necessary for the butterfly’s full development.
This project won Ebright first place in the county fair and an entry into the International Science and Engineering Fair.

43. What lessons did Richard Ebright learn when he didn’t win anything at the County Science Fair?

Answer: Richard Ebright was in seventh grade when he sent his first project in the County Science Fair. Everybody else had won something. But he returned empty-handed. It was really a sad experience for him. But his loss taught him an important lesson in life. He realised that to be a winner, he would have to do real experiments. His project of merely showing slides of frog tissues under a microscope didn’t click. He should have done real experiments and that is what real science is all about.

44. How did Richard Ebright grow cells from a monarch butterfly’s wing? What did that project win for Ebright?

Answer: Richard Ebright continued his journey farther. He grew cells from a monarch’s wing in a culture. He showed that cells could divide and develop into normal butterfly wing scales. They must be fed from the hormone received from the gold spots. This project won first place of zoology at the International Fair.

45. How and where did Richard Ebright identify the hormone’s chemical structure?

Answer: After his freshman year at Harvard University, Ebright went back to the laboratory of the Department of Agriculture. He did more work on the hormones of the gold spots. Using sophisticated instruments there, he was able to identify the hormone’s chemical structure.

46. How did Richard Ebright give an answer to one of biology’s puzzles—how the cell can read the blueprint of its DNA?

Answer: When Richard Ebright saw X-ray photos of the chemical structure of a hormone, he didn’t cry, “Eureka!” He didn’t even say, “I’ve got it!” He was sure that the photos gave him the answer to one of biology’s puzzles. He had found out how the cell could read the blueprint of its DNA. DNA is the substance in the nucleus of a cell that controls heredity. It is the blueprint for life.

47. Richard Ebright was a famous scientist but he had time for other interests too. What were the other interests and hobbies of Ebright?

Answer: Richard Ebright’s journey as a scientist started since he first began collecting butterflies. However, he found time for other interests and hobbies too. He became a champion debater and public speaker. He was a good canoeist. He was also an expert photographer. He excelled in photographing nature and scientific exhibits.

48. Why did Richard Ebright admire his teacher Richard A Weiherer?

Answer: Richard Ebright had great respect and admiration for his Social Studies teacher. He was Richard’s adviser to the Debating and Model United Nations Clubs. Richard A Weiherer was the perfect person for Ebright who opened his mind to new ideas.

49. What was Richard A Weiher’s opinion of his student Richard, Ebright?
Or
How did Richard A Weiherer, the Social Studies teacher of Ebright, judge him?

Answer: Mr. Richard A Weiherer was Ebright’s Social Studies teacher and adviser. Richard A. Weiherer described Ebright a man of varied interests. Ebright put in 3 to 4 hours at night doing debate research. Besides, he was doing all his research with butterflies and his other interests. Ebright was competitive and wanted to be the best.

50. Did Richard Ebright have all the ingredients that are necessary for the making of a scientist? Give a reasoned answer.
Or
Assess Richard Ebright as a scientist.

Answer: Fortunately, Richard Ebright had all the essential ingredients that are necessary for the making of a great scientist. He had a first-rate mind and always got first grades in schools. At Harvard, he was second in his class of 1510. He had the curiosity of knowing ‘why’ and ‘how’ of things. Last but not least, he was competitive and wanted to be the best. He had the will to win for the right reasons.

Long Answer Type Questions

1. ‘Success is failure turned inside out’. Prove the above statement with instances from the journey taken by Richard Ebright from losing at the science fair to winning at the international fair.

Answer: Success is the fruit of failure. It never comes straight but through failure. This can be seen in the life of Richard Ebright. Although he earned top grades in school, on everyday things he was just like every other kid. He faced many failures in his life but every failure strengthened his will to succeed. When he was in seventh grade he participated in County Science Fair with his slides of frog tissues. But he could not win a prize. This made him determined to win the prize and in his eighth grade, he again participated in the science fair with the experiment of viral disease in monarch caterpillars and won the prize. The very next year he participated with his experiment of whether viceroy butterflies copy the monarch butterflies in order to save their life from the birds and this project won Ebright, third prize in the overall county science fair.

His experiment regarding gold spots of monarch liar which he built a device that showed. That the spots produced hormones necessary for the full development of butterflies won third prize in international science and engineering fair.
Next year his advanced experiments on the monarch pupa won him first place at the international science fair. Thus, for Richard Ebright, we can say that success is failure turned inside out.

2. How does Richard Ebright become a scientist?

Answer: Richard Ebright had been a curious child even when he was in kindergarten. His curiosity prompted him to collect rocks, fossils, coins and butterflies. His mother’s encouragement and his bright mind also contributed to making him a success. His mother got him all that he needed to develop his scientific bent of mind. His response to Dr. Fredrick A. Urquhart to collect butterflies for his research gave him an opportunity in his endeavours. Then in the seventh grade, he got a hint of what real science is when he entered a country science fair and lost. He realized that winners had tried to do real experiments, not simply make a neat display.

Thereafter, Ebright worked sincerely on every science project he got every year in school. Then he stood first in a county fair that gave him entry into international science and engineering fair where he won third place. He then went on to win the highest honors and graduated from Harvard. His high school research into the purpose of the spots on a Monarch pupa eventually led him to his theory about cell life. Thus he became a renowned scientist.

3. “Richard Ebright was a successful scientist who gave a new theory of cells to the scientific world.” Elucidate.

Answer: Ebright tried experiments on butterflies for a science fair. In his project, in the second year of high school, he tried to explain the purpose of twelve tiny gold spots on a Monarch pupa. He found out that those spots produced a hormone necessary for the full development of a butterfly. He continued with his experiments even after graduation using sophisticated instruments of the university. He discovered the chemical structure of the hormone. He came across his new theory of cell life. It gave an answer to one of the questions — “How a cell can read the blueprint of DNA.”

4. Ebright’s backbone was his mother. How did she contribute to his learning? What kind of work did she find for him even at the dining table? What values did Ebright imbibe from his mother?
Or
Discuss the role of Ebright’s mother in making him a scientist.

Answer: Ebright’s mother played an important role in making him a scientist. She motivated him to learn new things. She took him on trips, bought him telescopes, microscopes, cameras, mounting material and other equipment.
Every evening mother and son worked together at the dining table. If Ebright had nothing to do, she would find his work — learning work. He was a keen learner, liked learning and got `A’ grade throughout his schooling. She also bought him a book, `The Travels of Monarch X’, which opened the world of science to him. Ebright’s mother helped him to become a scientist by sustaining his interest in the scientific field.

5. How did Ebright’s mother encourage him to become a scientist?

Answer: Ebright’s mother recognized his curiosity and encourage him. She took him on trips. She also bought him telescopes, microscopes, cameras and other equipment so that he could follow his hobbies. Ebright’s mother was his friend until he started going to school. She would bring home friends to him. Ebright’s mother would find work for him if he had nothing to do. She found learning tasks for him. He had a great hunger for learning. He earned top grades in school. By the time he was in second grade, he had collected 25 species of butterflies. One day his mother other gave him a children’s book. It opened the world of science to Ebright.

6. Which book proved to be a turning point in Ebright’s life?

Answer: One day, Ebright’s mother gave him a book. That book was ‘The Travels of Monarch X’. It described readers were monarch butterflies migrate to Central America. This book fascinated him. At the end of the book, deere invited to help study butterfly migrations. They were asked to tag butterflies for research by Dr. Frederick of Toronto University, Canada. Anyone who found a tagged butterfly was asked to send the tag to Dr. Frederick. Ebright started tagging monarch butterflies. The butterfly collecting season around Reading lasts only six weeks in late summer. He realized that chasing the butterflies one by one won’t enable him to catch many. So he decided to raise a flock of butterflies.

7. What experiments did Ebright do about monarch butterflies?

Answer: Ebright wrote to Dr. Frederick for ideas. In reply, the famous scientist gave him many suggestions for experiments. These experiments kept Ebright busy all through high school. He also won many prizes in the county and international science fairs. Ebright tried to find the cause of a viral disease that killed all monarch caterpillars. He thought the disease might be carried by a beetle. He tried raising caterpillars in the presence of beetles. But he didn’t get any real results. But he showed his experiment in the science fair and won. The next year’s science fair project was testing the theory that viceroy butterflies imitate monarchs. By copying monarchs, the viceroys escape being eaten by birds. This project was placed first in the zoology division and third overall in the county science fair.

8. How did Ebright discover an unknown insect hormone?

Answer: In his second year in high school, Ebright’s research led to his discovery of an unknown insect hormone. Indirectly, it led to his new theory on the life of cells. He tried to answer a very simple question. What is the purpose of the twelve tiny gold spots on a monarch pupa? To prove Ebright and one other student-built a device that showed that the spots were producing a hormone. It was necessary for the butterfly’s full development. This project won Ebright first place in the county fair and entry into the International Science and Engineering Fair. There he won third place for zoology.

9. How did Ebright get the idea for his new theory about cell life? How can this theory be beneficial?

Answer: One day, Ebright was seeing the X-ray photos of the chemical structure of cells. He got the idea for his new theory about cell life. Those photos provided him with the answer to one of biology’s puzzles: how the cell can ‘read’ the blueprint of its DNA. DNA is the substance in the nucleus of a cell that controls heredity. It is the blueprint for life. Ebright and his college room-mate James R. Wong drew pictures and constructed plastic models of molecules to show how it could happen. At the Harvard Medical School, Ebright began experimenting to test his theory. If the theory proves correct, it will be a big step towards understanding life processes. It might also lead to new ideas for preventing some types of cancer and other diseases.

10. Give a character sketch of Richard Ebright highlighting his achievements and his added interests.

Answer: Richard H Ebright was a many-faceted genius. He was a competent scientist, a lovable son, a respecting pupil and above all, a man with varied interests and hobbies. But first and foremost, he was a scientist. His fame rests on his wonderful works and achievement on butterflies. By the time he was in the second grade, Ebright collected all twenty-five species of butterflies found around in his hometown. Ebright was a great learner. He learned an important lesson at his first county science fair. He learned that winners do real experiments than making a neat display.

The book, Travels of Monarch X opened the world of science to the eager young collector. One of his famous projects was based on the theory that viceroy butterflies copied monarch butterflies to escape being eaten by birds. This project was placed first in the zoology division. Later, Ebright showed that the spots on a monarch pupa produced a hormone necessary for the butterfly’s development. He also proved that DNA controls heredity and is the blueprint for life.

Richard Ebright got all his encouragement, help and inspiration from his mother. He was her only companion and they spent almost every evening at the dining table. She encouraged his interest in learning. She bought him telescopes, microscopes, cameras and other instruments for him. Dr. Urquhart helped him with new suggestions and ideas. His Social Studies teacher, Richard A Weiherer, opened his mind to new ideas and made him competitive.

Richard Ebright was more than a scientist. He found time for other interests and hobbies. He was a champion debater and public speaker. He was a good canoeist and an expert photographer. He had a first-rate mind, competitive spirit and scientific curiosity.

11. Describe Richard Ebright’s various achievements in science, particularly his great work on the monarch butterflies. Who did Ebright look to for getting fresh ideas and suggestions?

Answer: Richard Ebright had all the necessary ingredients that are required in the making of a scientist. He had a first-rate mind, was competitive and had the will to win. Above all, he was a great collector and never lost his scientific curiosity. His scientific journey started very early. While he was still in the second grade, he had collected all the species of butterflies found around his hometown. The Travels of Monarch X was the book that changed his life. It opened the world of science to the eager collector. His failure at his first county science fair taught him an important lesson. He learned that winners do real experiments. One of the most important projects of Richard Ebright was to prove that viceroy butterflies try to look like monarch butterflies. They do so to avoid being eaten by birds.

Ebright also proved that twelve tiny gold spots on a monarch pupa produced a hormone that was necessary for the butterfly’s full development. His other project won first place for zoology at the International Fair. It showed that if cells are fed the hormone from the gold spots, they can develop into normal butterfly wing scales. The crowning achievement of Ebright’s brilliant scientific career was his work on the chemical structure of a hormone. He proved that a cell can read the blueprint of its DNA and thus DNA controls heredity and is the blueprint for life.

Richard Ebright looked to Dr. Urquhat for fresh ideas and suggestions. The book, The Travels of Monarch X, opened the world of science to him. He sent tagged butterflies to Dr. Urquhart for his research works. Dr. Urquhart’s new ideas and suggestions helped Ebright to achieve prizes and honors in the county and International Science Fairs.

12. How did The Travels of Monarch X open the world of science to Richard Ebright? Elaborate.

Answer: It is absolutely true that the book called The Travels of Monarch X changed the very course of Ebright’s life. That book told how monarch butterflies migrated to Central America. Richard Ebright was a passionate and eager collector. By the time he was in the second grade, he had collected all twenty-five species of butterflies found around his hometown. Had he not got The Travels of MonarchX, Richard Ebright’s butterfly collecting would have ended. The book was a children’s book and was gifted to him by his mother.

At the end of the book, readers were invited to help study butterfly migrations. They were asked to tag butterflies for research to Dr. Urquhart. Soon, Ebright started sending tagged butterflies to Dr. Urquhart of the University of Toronto, Canada. Then, Ebright started raising a flock of butterflies in his basement. For several years his basement was home to thousands of monarch butterflies in different stages of development.

Dr. Urquhart had a dominating influence on Richard Ebright’s life. He made him do elaborate experiments on monarch butterflies. Ebright succeeded in proving that viceroy butterflies copy monarch butterflies to avoid being eaten by birds. He also showed how DNA controls heredity and is the blueprint for life.

13. Describe the contribution of his mother in Richard Ebright’s life. What role did she play in making Ebright a scientist?

Answer: They say that behind the success of a man stands a woman. And in Richard Ebright’s success as a scientist and also as a man, solidly stood his mother. Richard Ebright’s father had died when he was just in the third grade. “Richie was my life after his father died …,” said his mother. He was her only companion and they spent almost every evening at the dining table.

Ebright’s mother encouraged his interest in learning. She knew that her son had a driving curiosity along with a bright mind. She took him on trips, bought him telescopes, microscopes, cameras, mounting materials and other equipment. She helped Ebright in many ways. She was an important link between Dr. Urquhart and her son. She wrote to Dr. Urquhart and after her advice, Ebright sent tagged butterflies to him in Canada. She knew that her son had a passion for collecting things. By the time he was in the second grade, Ebright had collected all twenty-five species of butterflies found around his hometown. His interest in his butterfly collecting would have ended had she not got him a children’s book called The Travels of Monarch X. That book told how monarch butterflies migrated to Central America. It opened the world of science to the eager collector.

14. How did Richard Ebright not winning anything at his first County Science Fair motivate him to become a great scientist? What lessons did he learn from his failure there?

Answer: Richard Ebright had started the work of butterflies and insects from a very early age. His main work was based on butterflies, particularly monarch butterflies. By the time he was in the second grade, he had collected all twenty-five species of butterflies found around his hometown. But he learned the lesson of his life when he was in the seventh grade. He got a hint of what real science was. He entered the County Science Fair with a project. His project was slides of frog tissues, which he showed under a microscope.

In the fair, he failed miserably. He didn’t get anything while everybody else had won something. It was really a very sad feeling for him. From his first county science fair, Ebright came to know what real science was. He also learned a lesson of knowing what made a winner. He realised his mistakes. He had only made a neat display of frog tissues under a microscope. He realised that winners had tried real experiments.

From then onwards, he looked to Dr. Urquhart for new ideas and suggestions. Dr. Urquhart gave him a number of suggestions for experiments. Continuous research and experimentations won him great honors and prizes locally as well as internationally.

15. What other interests, besides science did Richard Ebright pursue? Why did Ebright respect and praise his Social Studies teacher so much?

Answer: No doubt, first and foremost, Richard Ebright was a scientist. He was interested in science, he first began to collect butterflies. But this scientist found time for other interests too. He was a man of many parts — a multifaceted genius. Not only did he collect butterflies but also took a deep interest in other activities. He collected rocks, fossils, and coins. He became an eager astronomer. He would indulge in star-gazing sometimes all night. Ebright also became a champion debater and public speaker. In this field, his Social Studies teacher turned Ebright’s tremendous energy towards the Debating and Model United Nations Clubs. He was a good canoeist and all-around outdoors-person. He was also an expert photographer. He excelled in nature and scientific exhibits. In brief, besides being a remarkable scientist, Richard Ebright enjoyed all pleasures, adventures, hobbies and entertainment that a happy and civilised living provided to him.

Self-Assessment Test

Short Answer Questions

1. “Richard was the focus of his mother’s attention”. Compose a thesis on this.
2. Comment on the role of Mr weathered in Ebright’s life.
3. Identify four values which Richard Ebright projected as a man of substance.
4. How did Richard’s mother help him to become a scientist?
5. What are the factors which contributed in making Ebright a scientist?

Long Answer Questions

1. Describe Richard Ebright’s childhood.
2. Discuss the role of Ebright’s mother in making him a scientist.
3. How did Ebright’s journey as a biologist begin with butterflies?

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