NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Civics Chapter 5 Popular Struggles and Movements

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Social Science Civics Chapter 5 Popular Struggles and Movements are provided here. With these solutions, you will learn the right way to write answers to the questions perfectly in exams. We have updated the NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Civics Chapter 5 Popular Struggles and Movements for the current session so that you can easily score high marks in the exams. You can also download PDF of the solutions and use them whenever you are offline.

Class 10 Social Science Civics Chapter 5 NCERT Solutions

Question 1: In what ways do pressure groups and movements exert influence on politics?

Answer: Pressure groups and movements exert influence on politics in the following ways:

  • They attempt to influence government policies
  • They gain public support and sympathy for a cause
  • They carry out protests, campaigns and exhibitions to gather people
  • They lobby together to alter a decision

Question 2: Describe the forms of relationship between pressure groups and political parties?

Answer:  The relationship between pressure groups and political parties can take different forms. It may be a direct or indirect relationship as mentioned below:

Formation of pressure groups by leaders or led by them: Pressure groups are often formed and led by politicians and political parties. For example, most trade unions and students’ organizations in India are either established or affiliated to one or the other major political party. Examples are NSUI, ABVP.

Formation of political parties out of movements: Political parties sometimes grow out of movements. Parties like DMK and AIADMK were formed this way. Similarly, when the Assam movement led by students against the ‘foreigners’ came to an end, Asom Gana Parishad was formed.

Indirect relation: Sometimes pressure groups and movements and political parties take positions that are opposed to each other. But they remain in contact with each other. Most of the new leadership of political parties comes from interest or movement groups. For example, student leaders of Delhi University join politics in the long run.

Question 3: Explain how the activities of pressure groups are useful in the functioning of a democratic government.

Answer: Pressure groups help in the deepening of democracy. As long as everyone gets the opportunity, putting pressure on the rulers is not an unhealthy activity in a democracy. Governments can often come under undue pressure from a small group of rich and powerful people. Pressure groups perform a useful role of countering this undue influence of reminding the government of the needs and concerns of ordinary citizens.

Question 4: What is a pressure group? Give a few examples.

Answer: Pressure group is an organization that attempts to influence government policies. They do not aim to directly control or share political power. These are formed when people with common occupation, interests, aspirations, or opinions come together in order to achieve a common objective. The term pressure group, therefore, refers to any interest group whose members share certain common attributes, make claims on other groups, and on the political process. Examples are FEDECOR and BAMCEF.

Question 5: What is the difference between a pressure group and a political party?

Answer:

Pressure GroupPolitical Party
Organised or unorganisedOrganised
Participation is open to allParticipation is through a set norm
The cause is to fight against a common purposeTheir role is to form a government
They don’t contest electionsThey contest elections
All participants have the same ideologyMinisters can have different ideologies

Question 6: Organisations that undertake activities to promote the interests of specific social sections such as workers, employees, teachers, and lawyers are called _____________________ groups.

Answer: Organisations that undertake activities to promote the interests of specific social sections such as workers, employees, teachers, and lawyers are called sectional interest groups.

Question 7: Which among the following is the special feature that distinguishes a pressure group from a political party?

(a) Parties take political stances, while pressure groups do not bother about political issues.
(b) Pressure groups are confined to a few people, while parties involve a larger number of people.
(c) Pressure groups do not seek to get into power, while political parties do.
(d) Pressure groups do not seek to mobilize people, while parties

Answer: (c) Pressure groups do not seek to get into power, while political parties do.

Question 8: Match List I (organisations and struggles) with List-II and select the correct answer using the codes given below the lists:

List-IList-II
1.Organisations that seek to promote the interests of a particular section or groupA. Movement
2.Organisations that seek to promote a common interestB. Political parties
3.Struggles launched for the resolution of a social problem with or without groups an organisational structureC. Sectional interest groups
4.Organisations that mobilise people with a view to win political powerD. Public interest groups
1234
(a)CDBA
(b)CDAB
(c)DCBA
(d)BCDA

Answer: 

1234
(b)CDAB

Question 9: Match List-I with List-II and select the correct answer using the codes given below the lists:

List-IList-II
1.Pressure groupA. Narmada Bachao Andolan
2.Long-term movementB. Asom Gana Parishad
3.Single issue movementC. Women’s movement
4.Political partyD. Fertilizer dealers’ association
1234
(a)DCAB
(b)BADC
(c)CDBA
(d)BDCA

Answer: 

1234
(a)DCAB

Question 10: Consider the following statements about pressure groups and parties.

(A) Pressure groups are the organised expression of the interests and views of specific social sections.
(B) Pressure groups take positions on political issues.
(C) All pressure groups are political parties.

Which of the statements given above are correct?

(a) A, B, and C
(b) A and B
(c) B and C
(d) A and C

Answer: (b) A and B

Class 10 Political Science (Civics) Chapter 5 Popular Struggles and Movements: Chapter Overview

In the previous chapters, you have learned why power sharing is important in a democracy and how different tiers of government and various social groups share power. In this chapter, you will see how those who exercise power are constrained by the influence and pressure exerted on them. Democracy almost invariably involves a conflict of interests and viewpoints. These differences are often expressed in organised ways. Those who are in power are required to balance these conflicting demands and pressures. This chapter with a discussion of how struggles around conflicting demands and pressures shape democracy. This leads to an analysis of the different ways and organisations through which ordinary citizen can play a role in democracy. Further, you will see the indirect ways of influencing politics, through pressure groups and movements.

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