Class 7 History Chapter 3 The Delhi Sultans Extra Questions and Answers

Class 7 History Chapter 3 The Delhi Sultans extra questions and answers available here. Solving class 7 extra questions help students to revise the Chapter most competently. We prepared these questions as per the latest NCERT book and CBSE syllabus. Practicing these extra questions before the exam will ensure excellent marks in the exam.

The Delhi Sultans Class 7 History Extra Questions and Answers

Very Short Extra Questions and Answers

1: Delhi was made capital by the rulers of__________.

Answer: Tomar dynasty

2: Mughal emperor Humayun, was defeated by_______.

Answer: Sher shah

3: Who was the founder of the Sayyed dynasty?

Answer: Khizr Khan

4: Timur attacked India in 1398 AD and later defeated Tughlaqs. True/False

Answer: True

5: Kharaj was a tax on cultivation. True/False

Answer: Three

6: How many taxes were levied by the Delhi Sultans?

Answer: Three types of taxes imposed by the Sultans of Delhi were kharaj, ghari and chari.

7: Name the Three types of taxes imposed by the Sultans of Delhi.

Answer: True

8: During whose reign Sultanate faced maximum Mongol invasion?

Answer: Alauddin Khalji

9: Who invaded Southern India for the first time?

Answer: Alauddin Khalji

10: Delhi achieved the status of capital for the first time under the rule of ____________.

Answer: Tomara Rajputs

11: What was the term ‘iqta’stood for, during the Sultanate period?

Answer: land assigned to military commanders.

12: The Chauhan dynasty which ruled Delhi from 1165 came to power after defeating ____________.

Answer: Tomaras

13: Alauddin Khilji established a separate department to carry out the assessment and collection of the land revenue. True/False

Answer: True

14: Who made the plan to capture Monghol territory?

Answer: Mohammad Tughluq

15: Who abolished Iqta?

Answer: Alaud din Khilji

16: Ibn Battuta belonged to Persia?

Answer: No, Morocco

17: Where the idea of “Three orders” was first formulated?

Answer: France

18: Name the Ruler who has shifted capital from Delhi to Daultabad.

Answer: Muhammad Tughlaq

19: A type of coin minted at Delhi is known as the __________.

Answer: The Dehliwal type

20: Who defeated the Tomars and took control over Delhi?

Answer: Chouhans

21: When did Raziya Sultan lost the control of Delhi?

Answer: 1240 AD.

22: Name the main mosque of Jahanpanah.

Answer: Begumpuri mosque

23: The Quwat-al-Islam is located in__________.

Answer: Delhi

24: Under whose reign the system of Iqtadari was thoroughly modernized?

Answer: Muhammad Tughlaq.

25: What was the another name for Iqtadars?

Answer: Muktis

26: A token currency similar to today’s paper currency was released during the reign of ___________.

Answer: Iqtadars

27: The holders of Iqta were known as ____________.

Answer: Iltutmish

28: During whose reign the system of bandagan came into existence?

Answer: Sikander Lodi

29: Moth Ki Masjid was constructed during the time of ______________.

Answer: Kharaj

30: The name that denotes land tax was ___________.

Answer: Muhammad Bin Tughlaq

31: Who founded the City of Delhi called the “Sanctuary of the World”?

Answer: Muhammed Tughlaq

32: Who modernized the iqta system?

Answer: Alauddin Khalji

33: Who was the emperor in charge of constructing the Moth Ki Masjid?

Answer: Sikander Lodi

34: Name the ruler who made the state directly responsible for the collection of land revenue.

Answer: Allauddin Khalji

35: Name a famous traveler who came from the country of Morocco in the fourteenth century.

Answer: Ibn batuta

36. What is the time of rule of Ananga Pala?

Answer: 1130 -1145

37. What was the other name for Iqtadar?

Answer: The other name for Iqtadar is muqti.

38. Who abolished the Iqta System?

Answer:  Alauddin Khalji abolished the Iqta System.

39. What was the language of administration under the Delhi Sultans?

Answer: Persian was the language of administration under the Delhi Sultans.

40. From which country did Ibn Battuta travel to India?

Answer: Ibn Battuta travelled to India from Morocco, Africa.

41. When was Moth ki Masjid built?

Answer: Moth ki Masjid was built in the reign of Sikandar Lodi by his minister.

42. For how many years Suri dynasty ruled?

Answer: The Suri dynasty ruled for only fifteen years (1540-1555).

43. Who made the plan to capture Mongol territory?

Answer:  Muhammad Tughluq planned a campaign to capture Mongol territory.

44. Which ruler first established his or her capital at Delhi?

Answer: Tomara Rajputs were the first rulers who established their capital at Delhi.

45. What does the word mosque literally mean?

Answer: A mosque is literally a place where a Muslim prostrates in reverence to Allah.

46. In whose reign did the Sultanate reach its farthest extent?

Answer: The Sultanate reached its farthest extent during the reign of Muhammad Tughluq.

47. When and where the idea of “Three orders” was first formulated?

Answer:  The idea of the “Three Orders” was first formulated in France in the early eleventh century.

48. What is a mosque called in Arabic?

Answer: A mosque is called a masjid in Arabic, literally a place where a Muslim prostrates in reverence to Allah.

49. What was the duty of muqtis?

Answer: The duty of the muqtis was to lead military campaigns and maintain law and order in their iqtas.

Short Extra Questions and Answers

1. Why did the authors of Persian tawarikh criticise the Delhi Sultans?

Answer: The authors of Persian tawarikh criticised the Delhi Sultans for appointing the “low and base-born” to high offices.

2. What is called qibla?

Answer: During prayer, Muslims stand facing Mecca. In India this is to the west. This is called the qibla.

3. Name the main mosque of Jahanpanah.

Answer:  Begumpuri mosque, built in the reign of Muhammad Tughluq, was the main mosque of Jahanpanah.

4. Who defeated the Tomara Rajputs and when?

Answer: Tomara Rajputs were defeated in the middle of the twelfth century by the Chauhans (also referred to as Chahamanas) of Ajmer.

5. Name the ruler who made the state directly responsible for the collection of land revenue.

Answer: Alauddin Khalji made the state directly responsible for the collection of land revenue.

6. Name the famous traveler who came from Morocco, Africa in the fourteenth century.

Answer: Ibn Battuta was the famous traveler who came from Morocco, Africa in the fourteenth century.

7. Raziyya Sultan was unique in the history of the Delhi Sultanate. Do you think women leaders are accepted more readily today?

Answer: Yes, I think that as today scenario has changed. Due to spread of education, women leaders are accepted more readily today.

8. When was Begumpuri mosque built?

Answer: Begumpuri mosque, built in the reign of Muhammad Tughluq, was the main mosque of Jahanpanah, the “Sanctuary of the World”, his new capital in Delhi.

9. What do gender distinctions mean? How was it used?

Answer: Gender distinctions mean social and biological differences between women and men. Usually, these differences are used to argue that men are superior to women.

10. What do you mean by birthright?

Answer: Birthright means privileges claimed on account of birth. For example, people believed that nobles inherited their rights to govern, because they were born in certain families.

11. Who were the authors of tawarikh?

Answer: The authors of tawarikh were learned men: secretaries, administrators, poets and courtiers, who both recounted events and advised rulers on governance, emphasising the importance of just rule.

12. Define the term iqta, iqtadar or muqti.

Answer: Like the earlier Sultans, the Khalji and Tughluq monarchs appointed military commanders as governors of territories of varying sizes. These lands were called iqta and their holder was called iqtadar or muqti.

13. What are the various sources of information on Delhi Sultans?

Answer: Inscriptions, coins and architecture provide a lot of information, especially valuable are “histories”, tarikh (singular) / tawarikh (plural), written in Persian, the language of administration under the Delhi Sultans.

14. What did the Iqtadars or Muqtis do with the revenue they collected from the region?

Answer: In exchange for their military services, the muqtis collected the revenues of their assignments as salary. They also paid their soldiers from these revenues.

15. What is meant by the “internal” and “external” frontiers of the Sultanate?

Answer: “Internal frontiers” of the Sultanate mean the hinterlands of the garrison towns. The “external” frontiers of the Sultanate mean unconquered territories such as Southern India.

16. Alauddin’s administrative measures were successful. Comment.

Answer: Alauddin’s administrative measures were quite successful and chroniclers praised his reign for its cheap prices and efficient supplies of goods in the market. He successfully withstood the threat of Mongol invasions.

17. Name the ruler of Delhi sultanate after Iltutmish. What Minhaj-i Siraj thought about this ruler?

Answer: In 1236 Sultan Iltutmish’s daughter, Raziyya, became Sultan after Iltutmish. Minhaj-i Siraj thought that the queen’s rule went against the ideal social order created by God, in which women were supposed to be subordinate to men.

18. According to the “Circle of Justice”, why was it important for military commanders to keep the interests of the peasantry in mind?

Answer: According to the “Circle of Justice”, it was important for military commanders to keep the interests of the peasantry in mind because soldiers’ salaries come from the revenue collected from peasants and peasants can pay revenue only when they are prosperous and happy.

19. List the five dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate?

Answer: The five dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate are:

  • Early Turkish Rulers 1206- 1290
  • Khalji Dynasty 1290 – 1320
  • Tughluq Dynasty 1320 – 1414
  • Sayyid Dynasty 1414 – 1451
  • Lodi Dynasty 1451 – 1526

20. Why the early Delhi Sultans, especially Iltutmish, favoured their special slaves purchased for military service?

Answer: The early Delhi Sultans, especially Iltutmish, favoured their special slaves purchased for military service because they were carefully trained to man some of the most important political offices in the kingdom. Since they were totally dependent upon their master, the Sultan could trust and rely upon them.

21. What were the four stages involved in the preparation of a manuscript?

Answer: Four stages in the preparation of a manuscript
1. Preparing the paper.
2. Writing the text.
3. Melting gold to highlight important words and passages.
4. Preparing the binding.

22. Who were the bandagans and what was their role in the Delhi Sultanate?

Answer: The early Delhi Sultans, especially Iltutmish, favoured their special slaves purchased for military service, called bandagan in Persian. They were carefully trained to man some of the most important political offices in the kingdom. Since they were totally dependent upon their master, the Sultan could trust and rely upon them.

Long Extra Questions and Answers

1. Why do you think Barani criticised the Sultan?

Answer: Sultan Muhammad Tughluq appointed Aziz Khummar, a wine distiller, Firuz Hajjam, a barber, Mank a Tabbakh, a cook, and two gardeners, Ladha and Pira, to high administrative posts. Ziyauddin Barani, a midfourteenth century-chronicler, reported their appointments as a sign of the Sultan’s loss of political judgement and his incapacity to rule.

2. What was the impact of the Mongol invasions on the Delhi Sultanate?

Answer: The impact of the Mongol invasions on the Delhi Sultanate

(i) Alauddin constructed a new garrison town named Siri for his soldiers. He imposed taxes at 50 per cent of the peasant’s yield to feed the army. He began to pay his soldiers salaries in cash rather than iqtas.

(ii) Muhammad Tughluq shifted residents of Delhi to the new capital of Daulatabad in the south and converted Delhi into garrison town.

3. How did Delhi become an important city in the twelfth century?

Answer: Delhi first became the capital of a kingdom under the Tomara Rajputs, who were defeated in the middle of the twelfth century by the Chauhans (also referred to as Chahamanas) of Ajmer. It was under the Tomaras and Chauhans that Delhi became an important commercial centre. Many rich Jaina merchants lived in the city and constructed several temples. Coins minted here, called dehliwal, had a wide circulation.

4. Why did the rulers of the Delhi Sultanate fail to control the hinterlands initially?

Answer: The Sultans seldom controlled the hinterland of the cities and were therefore dependent upon trade, tribute or plunder for supplies. Controlling garrison towns in distant Bengal and Sind from Delhi was extremely difficult. Rebellion, war, even bad weather could snap fragile communication routes. The state was also challenged by Mongol invasions from Afghanistan and by governors who rebelled at any sign of the Sultan’s weakness.

5. Who was Raziyya? Why was she removed from the throne?

Answer: Raziyya was Sultan Iltutmish’s daughter. In 1236 she became Sultan. The chronicler of the age, Minhaj-i Siraj, recognised that she was more able and qualified than all her brothers. But he was not comfortable at having a queen as ruler. Nor were the nobles happy at her attempts to rule independently. So, she was removed from the throne in 1240.

6. Write a short note on idea of “Three orders” formulated in France in the early eleventh century.

Answer:  The idea of the “Three Orders” was first formulated in France in the early eleventh century. It divided society into three classes: those who prayed, those who fought, and those who tilled the land. This division of society into “Three Orders” was supported by the Church to consolidate its dominant role in society. This helped the emergence of a new warrior group called knights.

7. Discuss the importance of constructing mosque by the rulers of Delhi sultanate.

Answer: The Delhi Sultans built several mosques in cities all over the subcontinent. These demonstrated their claims to be protectors of Islam and Muslims. Mosques also helped to create the sense of a community of believers who shared a belief system and a code of conduct. It was necessary to reinforce this idea of a community because Muslims came from a variety of backgrounds.

8. What do you know about Quwwat al-Islam mosque?

Answer: Quwwat al-Islam mosque and minaret built during the last decade of the twelfth century. This was the congregational mosque of the first city built by the Delhi Sultans, described in the chronicles as Dehli-I kuhna (the old city). The mosque was enlarged by Iltutmish and Alauddin Khalji. The minar was built by three Sultans– Qutbuddin Aybak, Iltutmish and Firuz Shah Tughluq.

9. Why were the Delhi Sultans interested in cutting down forests? Does deforestation occur for the same reasons today?

Answer: Forests were cleared in the Ganga-Yamuna doab and hunter gatherers and pastoralists expelled from their habitat. These lands were given to peasants and agriculture was encouraged. New fortresses and towns were established to protect trade routes and to promote regional trade.

No, deforestation does not occur for the same reasons today. Today forests are cleared due to overpopulation, urbanization and commercialization.

10. What were the two reasons that prompted Muhammad-bin- Tughluq to shift the capital to Daulatabad?

Answer: The two reasons that prompted Muhammad-bin- Tughluq to shift the capital to Daulatabad were:

(i) The king felt that he would be able to control and administer the empire better from Daulatabad since it was located in the centre of empire.

(ii) The Mongols were a constant threat to Delhi. Daulatabad would be safe from Mongol attacks.

11. ‘Muhammad Tughluq’s administrative measures were a failure’. How?

Answer:  Muhammad Tughluq’s administrative measures were a failure. His campaign into Kashmir was a disaster. He then gave up his plans to invade Transoxiana and disbanded his large army. Meanwhile, his administrative measures created complications. The shifting of people to Daulatabad was resented. The raising of taxes and famine in the Ganga-Yamuna belt led to widespread rebellion. And finally, the “token” currency had to be recalled.

12. Write a short note on the ‘Token Currency System’ introduced by Muhammad Tughlaq.

Answer: Muhammad Tughluq also paid his soldiers cash salaries. But instead of controlling prices, he used a “token” currency, somewhat like present-day paper currency, but made out of cheap metals, not gold and silver. People in the fourteenth century did not trust these coins. They were very smart: they saved their gold and silver coins and paid all their taxes to the state with this token currency. This cheap currency could also be counterfeited easily.

13. Why did Alauddin control the prices of goods in Delhi? What did he do for this?

Answer: Alauddin Khalji raised a large standing army. The soldiers had to be paid. Alauddin chose to pay his soldiers salaries in cash rather than iqtas. The soldiers would buy their supplies from merchants in Delhi and it was thus feared that merchants would raise their prices. To stop this, Alauddin controlled the prices of goods in Delhi. Prices were carefully surveyed by officers, and merchants who did not sell at the prescribed rates were punished.

14. What forced the two rulers Allauddin Khilji and Muhammed Tughluq to mobilise a large standing army in Delhi?
Or
Write briefly about the invasion of the Mongols and its results.

Answer: The Mongols under Genghis Khan invaded Transoxiana in north-east Iran in 1219 and the Delhi Sultanate faced their onslaught soon after. Mongol attacks on the Delhi Sultanate increased during the reign of Alauddin Khalji and in the early years of Muhammad Tughluq’s rule. This forced the two rulers to mobilise a large standing army in Delhi which posed a huge administrative challenge.

15. Write about the authors of tawarikh in brief.
Or
Discuss the circumstances under which the authors of the Tawarikh wrote their chronicles.

Answer: About the authors of tawarikh

  • The authors of tawarikh lived in cities (mainly Delhi) and hardly ever in villages.
  • They often wrote their histories for Sultans in the hope of rich rewards.
  • These authors advised rulers on the need to preserve an “ideal” social order based on birthright and gender distinctions.
  • Their ideas were not shared by everybody.

16. Describe the ways in which the chieftains arranged for their defence.

Answer: Chieftains sometimes fortified themselves in mountains, in rocky, uneven and rugged places as well as in bamboo groves. In India the bamboo is not hollow; it is big. Its several parts are so intertwined that even fire cannot affect them, and they are on the whole very strong. The chieftains live in these forests which serve them as ramparts, inside which are their cattle and their crops. There is also water for them within, that is, rain water which collects there. Hence they cannot be subdued except by powerful armies, who entering these forests, cut down the bamboos with specially prepared instruments.”

17. Why did large parts of the subcontinent remain outside the control of the Delhi Sultans? What were its effects?
Or
Describe the provincial administration under the rulers of Delhi sultanate.

Answer: It is important to remember that large parts of the subcontinent remained outside the control of the Delhi Sultans. It was difficult to control distant provinces like Bengal from Delhi and soon after annexing southern India, the entire region became independent. Even in the Gangetic plain there were forested areas that Sultanate forces could not penetrate. Local chieftains established their rule in these regions. Sometimes rulers like Alauddin Khalji and Muhammad Tughluq could force their control in these areas but only for a short duration.

18. What were the steps taken to ensure that muqtis performed their duties? Why do you think they may have wanted to defy the orders of the Sultans?

Answer: Steps taken to ensure that muqtis performed their duties were:

(i) Their office was made inheritable and they were assigned iqtas for a short period of time before being shifted.

(ii) Accountants were appointed by the state to check the amount of revenue collected by the muqtis.

(iii) Care was taken that the muqti collected only the taxes prescribed by the state and that he kept the required number of soldiers.

The muqtis may have wanted to defy the orders of the Sultans because of harsh conditions of service imposed on them.

19. What did the Khaljis and Tughluqs help people of humble birth? How did this lead to political instability?

Answer: The Khaljis and Tughluqs raised people of humble birth, who were often their clients, to high political positions. They were appointed as generals and governors. However, this also introduced an element of political instability.

Slaves and clients were loyal to their masters and patrons, but not to their heirs. New Sultans had their own servants. As a result the accession of a new monarch often saw conflict between the old and the new nobility. The patronage of these humble people by the Delhi Sultans also shocked many elites and the authors of Persian tawarikh criticised the Delhi Sultans for appointing the “low and base-born” to high offices.

20. Who was sher shah sur? What was remarkable about his administration?

Answer:  Sher Shah Sur (1540-1545) started his career as the manager of a small territory for his uncle in Bihar and eventually challenged and defeated the Mughal emperor Humayun (1530-1540, 1555-1556). Sher Shah captured Delhi and established his own dynasty. Although the Suri dynasty ruled for only fifteen years (1540-1555), it introduced an administration that borrowed elements from Alauddin Khalji and made them more efficient. Sher Shah’s administration became the model followed by the great emperor Akbar (1556-1605) when he consolidated the Mughal Empire.

21. Do you think the authors of tawarikh would provide information about the lives of ordinary men and women?

Answer: No, I don’t think because of the following reasons:

  • The authors of tawarikh lived in cities (mainly Delhi) and hardly ever in villages.
  • They often wrote their histories for Sultans in the hope of rich rewards.    They had nothing to do with common people.
  • These authors advised rulers on the need to preserve an “ideal” social order based on birthright and gender distinctions. Their ideas were not shared by everybody.

22. Write a note on ‘internal frontier’ and ‘external frontier’.

Answer: The first set of campaigns along the “internal frontier” of the Sultanate aimed at consolidating the hinterlands of the garrison towns. During these campaigns forests were cleared in the Ganga-Yamuna doab and hunter gatherers and pastoralists expelled from their habitat. These lands were given to peasants and agriculture was encouraged. New fortresses and towns were established to protect trade routes and to promote regional trade.

The second expansion occurred along the “external frontier” of the Sultanate. Military expeditions into southern India started during the reign of Alauddin Khalji and culminated with Muhammad Tughluq. In their campaigns, Sultanate armies captured elephants, horses and slaves and carried away precious metals.

23. Write a short note on Alauddin’s administration.

Answer: (i) Delhi was attacked twice and as a defensive measure, Alauddin Khalji raised a large standing army.

(ii) Alauddin constructed a new garrison town named Siri for his soldiers.

(iii) The soldiers had to be fed. This was done through the produce collected as tax from lands between the Ganga and Yamuna. Tax was fixed at 50 per cent of the peasant’s yield.

(iv)The soldiers had to be paid. Alauddin chose to pay his soldiers salaries in cash rather than iqtas. The soldiers would buy their supplies from merchants in Delhi and it was thus feared that merchants would raise their prices. To stop this, Alauddin controlled the prices of goods in Delhi. Prices were carefully surveyed by officers, and merchants who did not sell at the prescribed rates were punished.

24. Write a short note on Muhammad Tughluq’s administration.

Answer: (i) The Sultanate was attacked in the early years of Muhammad Tughluq’s reign. He therefore raised a large standing army.

(ii) Rather than constructing a new garrison town, the oldest of the four cities of Delhi (Dehli-i Kuhna) was emptied of its residents and the soldiers garrisoned there. The residents of the old city were sent to the new capital of Daulatabad in the south.

(iii) Produce from the same area was collected as tax to feed the army. But to meet the need of the large number of soldiers the Sultan levied additional taxes.

(iv) Muhammad Tughluq also paid his soldiers cash salaries. He introduced “token” currency, made out of cheap metals. People in the fourteenth century did not trust these coins. They saved their gold and silver coins and paid all their taxes to the state with this token currency. This cheap currency could also be counterfeited easily.

25. Compare between the Administration of Alauddin Khalji and Muhammad Tughlaq.

Answer: Comparison between the Administration of Alauddin Khalji and Muhammad Tughlaq

Alauddin KhaljiMuhammad Tughluq
Alauddin Khalji raised a large standing army as defensive measure.He therefore raised a large standing army to attack on Transoxiana.  
Alauddin constructed a new garrison town named Siri for his soldiers.He evacuates four oldest cities of Delhi (Dehli-i Kuhna) and made soldiers garrison. The residents of the old city were sent to the new capital of Daulatabad in the south.  
The soldiers had to be fed. This was done through the produce collected as tax from lands between the Ganga and Yamuna. Tax was fixed at 50 per cent of the peasant’s yield.Produce from the same area was collected as tax to feed the army. But to meet the need of the large number of soldiers the Sultan levied additional taxes. This coincided with famine in the area.  
The soldiers had to be paid. Alauddin chose to pay his soldiers salaries in cash rather than iqtas. The soldiers would buy their supplies from merchants in Delhi and it was thus feared that merchants would raise their prices. To stop this, Alauddin controlled the prices of goods in Delhi. Prices were carefully surveyed by officers, and merchants who did not sell at the prescribed rates were punished.Muhammad Tughluq also paid his soldiers cash salaries. But instead of controlling prices, he used a “token” currency, somewhat like present-day paper currency, but made out of cheap metals, not gold and silver. People in the fourteenth century did not trust these coins. They saved their gold and silver coins and paid all their taxes to the state with this token currency. This cheap currency could also be counterfeited easily.  
Alauddin’s administrative measures were quite successful and chroniclers praised his reign for its cheap prices and efficient supplies of goods in the market. He successfully withstood the threat of Mongol invasions.Muhammad Tughluq’s administrative measures were a failure. His campaign into Kashmir was a disaster. He then gave up his plans to invade Transoxiana and disbanded his large army. Meanwhile, his administrative measures created complications. The shifting of people to Daulatabad was resented. The raising of taxes and famine in the Ganga-Yamuna belt led to widespread rebellion. And finally, the “token” currency had to be recalled.
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