Mijbil the Otter Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English First Flight

Mijbil the Otter Class 10 Extra Questions & Answers are available here. Class 10 English Mijbil the Otter extra questions and answers are prepared by our expert teachers. All these questions are divided into two or three sections. They are short type questions answers, long type question answers and extract based questions. Learning these questions will help you to score excellent marks in the board exams.

Mijbil the Otter Extra Questions and Answers

Very Short Answer Questions

1. Why was the author’s home at Camusfearna a fit place for an otter?
Answer: It was a fit place for an otter because it was surrounded by water.

2. From where could Maxwell get an otter?
Answer: He could get an otter from Tigris marshes.

3. Why did the author go to Basra?
Answer: He went to Basra to collect and answer his mail from Europe.

4. Who visited his room in Basra?
Answer: Two Arabs visited his room in Basra.

5. What was there in the sack?
Answer: There was an otter in the sack.

6. Where did the otter sleep on the second night?
Answer: On the second night, the otter slept on the author’s bed between his knees.

7. Why did the author book a flight to Paris instead of going directly to London?
Answer: He did not book a flight to London as the British airline would not fly an animal.

8. What did the author give the air hostess?
Answer: He gave the air hostess a parcel which contained fish for the otter.

9. What name did the scientists give to Mij’ species?
Answer:
 They gave his species the name of ‘Maxwell Otter’.

10. How did the woman in the aeroplane react to seeing the otter?
Answer:
 She stood up on her seat and screamed out ‘A rat! A rat!’.

11. Why was the otter named ‘Maxwell’s, Otter?
Answer:
 The otter was named Maxwell’s otter because it was Maxwell who made this species known to the scientists.

12. Where could Maxwell get an otter from?
Answer: Maxwell could get an otter from the Tigris marshes in Iraq.

13. ‘She was the queen of her kind’. Explain the reason behind admiration for the air hostess.
Answer: The air hostess whom the narrator called for assistance suggested to him that he could keep Mijbil on his knee during the flight, so as to comfort him.

14. Why was the author not allowed to take a flight of British Airways?
Answer: British Airways did not allow pets on its flight, while the author had to carry his pet otter along with him.

15. Why were Maxwell and his friends going to Basra?
Answer: Maxwell and his friends went to Basra to the Consulate-General (of Iraq) to collect and answer their mail from Europe.

16. Why the otter was named ‘Maxwell’s otter’?
Answer: The otter was of a race previously unknown to science and was at length christened by zoologists as ‘Maxwell’s otter’.

17. How did the otter look?
Answer: the otter was a small creature and it resembled with a medically conceived dragon. It was coated with symmetrical seals at mud from head to the rip at the tail.

18. What happened when Maxwell would call the otter by his name?
Answer: Mij would follow Maxwell without a lead and come to him when his name was called.

Short Answer Type Questions

1. Describe the havoc created by Mijbil on the aeroplane when it came out of the box.

Answer: When Maxwell opened the box, Mijbil in out and disappeared at high speed Own the aircraft. He caused a great hue and cry in the aircraft. There were sounds of shrieks across the flight.

2. What were the guesses made by the Londoners about Mijbil?

Answer: According to Maxwell, the average Londoner does not reclog another. Whosever saw Mijbil made different guesses about who he was. They go squirrel, a walrus, a hippo, a beaver, a bear cub, a leopard and a brontosaur.

3. How was `Mijbil’ a source of amazement on London streets?

Answer: The otter was a constant source of amazement to the Lon do y few p nears a strange as very had ever seen an otter. They were filled with surprise on seeing such animals. They guessed it with different names of animals.

4. Give an example from the text to show that Mijbil is an intelligent animal.

Answer: Mij loved to play. He had invented many games of his own. One was rolling marbles on his flat belly, another was keeping the ball on the high end of the suitcase and waiting at the other end for its arrival.

5. What happened when Mij disappeared at speed down the aircraft?
Or
What happened when Maxwell opened the box on the plane?

Answer: When Maxwell opened the box, Mijbil flashed out and disappeared at high speed down the aircraft. He caused a great hue and cry in the aircraft. There were sounds of shrieks across the flight.

6. Prove that Mijbil loved the water, giving two instances in support of your answer.
Or
How did Maxwell learn of Mijbil’s love for water?

Answer: Mij loved to play in the water. Only once did the author lead him to the bathroom. Mex$ time he went to the bathroom on his own. He went wild in the water, plunged and rolled in e’, He shot up and down the bathtub and made enough slosh and splash in it.

7. Mijbil, the otter invented a game. What do you think would be the game that he invented?
Or
What game did Mijbil invent?
Or
Describe some of the games Mij liked to play.

Answer: Mij invented his own game with a ping-pong ball. He used to keep the basilica lid of the damaged suitcase which when closed, remained at a slope from one end. He to play in the water and also liked to jump and gallop the full length of the 30-yard school well

8. What is the most common characteristic of an otter?
Or
Which groups of animals do otters belong to?

Answer: Otters belong to a small group of animals called Mussel lines. They are water-loving animals and are generally found in marshy areas. They are intelligent, fun-loving and playful and are harmless beautiful creatures.

9. What routine did Mijbil follow everyday while on the walk-in London?
Or
What were the ‘compulsive habits’ of Mijbil?
Or
How did Mijbil pass his time in London?

Answer: Mij on his way home every day used to tug Maxwell to the low wall of a primary school opposite to his flat. Mij would jump on to it, gallop the full length of its thirty yards and cause a hopeless distraction to both pupils and staff within the primary school.

10. When did it come to the author’s mind to have an otter?
Or
Why did Maxwell keep an otter as a pet?

Answer: The author’s pet dog had died and hence he was not willing to keep another dog as a pet. So, he thought of buying an otter and thought Camusfearna, ringed by water would be suitable for keeping an otter.

11. Why did Maxwell put the otter back in the box? How do you think he felt when he did this?

Answer: Maxwell was getting late for the flight. There were only ten minutes left for the flight to take off and the airport was five miles away. Hence he had to put the otter back into the box. He felt bad about doing so but he had no other option.

12. When and why did Maxwell think of keeping an otter as a pet?

Answer: Maxwell had travelled to Southern Iraq early in the year of 1956. There he thought of keeping an otter as a pet. He thought so because of Camusfearna. surrounded by water, could be a suitable place for this purpose.

13. How did the otter behave in the beginning?

Answer: In the beginning, the otter was neither hostile or friendly. He was simply aloof and indifferent. He referred to sleep on the floor as far from the writer’s bed as possible.

14. What are ‘compulsive habits’? What does Maxwell say are the compulsive habits of school children?

Answer: Things that one feels competed to do are ‘compulsive habits’. For example, school children try to-nr place their feet on the centre of each paving block on the way. They touch every seventh upright of the iron railings. Or, they pass to the outside of every second lamp post.

15. What would Mij do on the low wall adjoining the school opposite to Maxwell’s flat in London?

Answer: Along the frontage of the school ran a low wall about two feet high. Mij would tug Maxwell to this wall. Then Mij would jump on to it, and run with leaps the full length of its thirty yards.

16. What had crossed the author’s mind and why? Or why did Maxwell think of keeping an otter as a pet?

Answer: Maxwell’s favourite dog Jonnie died. It left him alone without a pet. He travelled to Southern Iraq in 1956. By then it has crossed his mind that he should like to keep an otter instead of a dog. The place he lived in was ringed by water. It was quite a suitable place for his new experiment.

17. What did his friend advise Maxwell?

Answer: Maxwell had already decided to keep an otter as a pet instead of a dog. He casually mentioned it to a friend. He advised Maxwell that he should try to get an otter in the Tigris marshes. Otters were as common there as were mosquitoes. They were often tamed by the Arabs.

18. Why were they going to the Consulate-General in Basra? Why did he wait for five days there?

Answer: Maxwell and his companions were going to Basra to the Consulate-General to collect and answer their mail from Europe. He found that his friend’s mail had arrived but that he had not. He cabled to England but nothing happened. He tried to telephone but didn’t get any success. His mail came only after five days.

19. How did Maxwell get Mijbil, the otter?

Answer: Maxwell had changed his idea of keeping a dog as his pet. He decided to have an otter. He had asked one of his friends to arrange for an otter. He went to his bedroom to read his mail. Two Arabs were squatting on the floor. Beside them lay a sack. They handed him a note which said, “Here is your otter …”. The sack was opened. In this way, Maxwell got his new pet — an otter.

20. Describe the physical appearance of Mijbil, the otter.

Answer: The creature that emerged from the sack was a unique one. He resembled like a very small imaginary dragon of the Middle Ages. Its body was coated with pointed scales. Between them a soft velvet fur was visible. It was like a chocolate brown mole.

21. Why has Mijbil christened Maxwell’s otter?

Answer: The narrator called his pet Mijbil. The otter, in fact, belonged to a race unknown to science so far. It was christened at length by zoologists Lutrogale perspicillata maxwelli or Maxwell’s otter. It was christened after the name of his master.

22. How did Mijbil behave in the beginning? Did some change come in the otter afterwards?

Answer: During the first 24 hours, Mijbil was neither hostile or friendly. He was aloof and indifferent. He slept on the floor far away from Maxwell’s bed. However, a change came in Mijbil afterwards. Ile started taking a keen interest in his surroundings. He went to Maxwell’s bed on the second day and remained asleep in it.

23. How did Mijbil behave when he was taken to the bathroom?

Answer: The narrator took Mijbil on a lead to the bathroom. He went wild with joy in the water for half an hour. He continued plunging and rolling in it. He splashed up and down the length of the bathtub underwater. He made enough slosh and splash a fora hippo.

24. What is a characteristic of otter and how did Mijbil behave in the water?

Answer: The main characteristic of an otter is to extend and spread every drop of water about the place. A bowl full of water must be overturned. He would sit in and splash in until it flows.

25. How did Mijbil fumble at the tap in the bathroom? Did he succeed?

Answer: Maxwell saw Mijbil standing up on the end of his bathtub. He was fumbling at the taps with his paws. Very soon he turned the tap to produce a trickle of water. And soon after he achieved the full flow.

26. How would Mijbil play with a rubber ball, and jiggle with small objects and marbles?

Answer: Mijbil spent hours shuffling a rubber ball around the room like a four-footed soccer player. But the real game which Mijbil enjoyed most was juggling with small objects with his paws lying on his back. Mijbil’s favourite toys for his play were marbles.

27.How was Mijbil transported from Basra to London?

Answer: It was a difficult job for Maxwell to be transported from Basra to London. The British airline wouldn’t fly animals. He booked a flight to Paris on another airline. Mijbil was put into a small box an hour before so that he would become accustomed to it.

28. Why did Maxwell call the air hostess “the queen of her kind?”

Answer: The air hostess was very friendly and cooperative. Maxwell took her into his confidence and gave her a parcel of fish for Mijbil. He admired her and called her “the queen of her kind”. The air hostess suggested that he could keep his pet on his knee.

29. Where did Mijbil disappear and how was he found?

Answer: The moment the box was open Mij was out of it in a flash. He soon disappeared down the aircraft. There were squawks and shrieks. A woman stood up crying for “A rat! A rat!” Mijbil was found beneath the legs of a turbaned Indian. Maxwell dived for him but found his face covered in curry. In the end, Mijbil himself came and sat on Maxwell’s knee.

30. What compulsive habits like children did Mijbil develop during walks in the London streets?

Answer: Mij developed some compulsive habits like children during the walks in the streets of London. Children touched each pairing block or pass to the outside of every second lamp-post. Mijbil would jump on to the low wall of a primary school. Doing so, he would distract both the students and the staff.

31. What were the wild guesses that the average Londoners make in recognising Mijbil? Whose remark was adjudged best by Maxwell?

Answer: The average Londoners were surprised to see such a unique animal. They made wild guesses about the otter. Some called him ‘a baby seal’, ‘a squirrel’, ‘a walrus’. Others called him ‘beaver’, ‘a bear cub’ and ‘a leopard’. The best remark came from a labourer. On seeing Mijbil, he asked, “What is that supposed to be?”

Long Answer Type Questions

1. Mijbil did things which demonstrated its personality. Which qualities of the narrator are shown in his care for Mijbil?

Answer: Mijbil was an intelligent, fun-loving and playful otter. It was fond of water. When Maxwell took it to the bathroom, for half an hour, it went wild with joy in the water, plunging and rolling in it. Maxwell treated Mijbil like his own son. He took care of him very well. He gave him lots of toys including marbles, rubber balls, rubber fruits and a terrapin shell to play with. He also noticed Mijbil’s habits and traits. Maxwell encouraged Mijbil to do whatever he liked to do. He took him out for exercise every day. When Maxwell saw him in blood, he was horrified. He took him out of the box; he jumped all over and then sat on Maxwell’s lap quietly.

2. Why did Maxwell wants to have an otter for a pet? How did he get one?

Answer: Gavin Maxwell, the author, wanted to own a pet. His pet dog had died recently and he was feeling too sad to think of keeping a dog as a pet again. So when he travelled to Southern Iraq, he decided to keep an otter instead of a dog. His friend suggested to Maxwell that he could get an otter in the Tigris marshes for they were very common there, like mosquitoes.

Moreover, the friend also informed, that otters were often trained by the Arabs. venally Maxwell and his friend went to Basra to the Consulate-General to collect their mail. Later on, i.e., a few days later the author received his mail and took it to his bedroom to ‘iced. There, he found two Arabs squatting on the floor with the sack that contained the otter with a letter from his friend that said, “Here is your otter….”

3. What did Maxwell do to transport Mijbil to England?

Answer: After the British Airways refused to take a pet on its flight, the narrator booked a flight to Paris by another airline. This airline insisted that the pet should be packed into a box not more than eighteen inches square, to be carried on the floor near his feet. Maxwell had a box made, and an hour before they started, put Mij into the box so that he would become accustomed to it and then left for a hurried meal.

But when he returned he was terrified. There was an appalling silence. Maxwell found blood had trickled and dried around the air holes of the box. He tore open the box to find Mij exhausted, and blood splattered, and whimpering and he caught hold of Maxwell’s leg. However, since he had very little time left to board the flight, Maxwell just put Mij back into the box, holding down the lid with his hand. On the flight, the stewardess, on hearing the author’s tale, permitted him to travel with Mij on his knee. After the initial chaos, Mijbil travelled to London on the author’s knee.

4. Describe the relationship between the otter and Maxwell in your own words.

Answer: Maxwell and the otter Mijbil shared a lovely relationship. Maxwell treated Mij like his own son. He took very good care of him. He gave him many toys including marbles, rubber bands, rubber fruits and a terrapin shell to play with. He took him to the bathtub to play in the water knowing the fascination of otters with water. He noticed his habits and traits. Mijbil hesitated on the first day but then became very friendly. Maxwell encouraged Mijbil to do whatever he liked to do. He took him out for exercise every day. When Maxwell saw blood on the box in which Mij was packed, he was horrified. When Mij came out of the box he jumped all over but then came and sat on Maxwell’s knees quietly.

5. How did it come to the mind of the writer that an otter can be substituted for dogs or cats?

Answer: The author’s pet dog had died, he was too sad to think of keeping a dog again. Maxwell’s friend suggested him to get an otter from Tigris marshes for they were as common as mosquitoes over there. Moreover, they were often trained by the Arabs. He had to go to Basra to the Consulate-General to collect and answer his mail. His mail had not arrived yet so he had to wait. There he received an otter sent by his friend through two Arabs. The author felt a strong attachment and feelings for it. He liked it and kept it.

6. When did the author decided to have an otter as a pet? How did he get an otter?

Answer: The author had a pet dog. Jonnie. When Jonnie died, his life without a pet was lonely. In 1956. he went to Southern Iraq. He had decided by then that he would keep an otter as a pet instead of a dog. His home in Scotland had much water around it. So it would be suitable for an otter. The author shared this idea with a friend. He supported the idea and suggested that he should take an otter from the Tigris marshes. He said that otters were in plenty at that place. One day, the author found two Arabs in his room. They had brought a sack with them. In the sack, there was an otter. They said that it was for him.

7. How did the otter look when the author got it? What name did he get it? How did the otter enjoy being in the bathroom?

Answer: The otter was a small creature like a small dragon. It was covered with mud from head to tail. Under the mud, it had soft velvet skin. The author named the otter ‘Mijbil’. His race was unknown to scientists. On the first night, it slept on the floor. The next slipped on the author’s bed and slept between his knees. Mijbil started taking interest in its surroundings. When Mijbil was taken to the bathroom he enjoyed his bath. He went wild with joy in the water of the tub. The author knew that the otters are fond of water. Two days later, Mijbil escaped from the bedroom. It went to the bathroom. He sat into the bathtub and turned the tap on. He was happy under the running water.

8. How did the author make arrangements for transporting his otter to London?

Answer: It was time for the author to come back from Iraq. He dreaded the prospect of transporting Mij to England. He knew that the British Airline would not fly animals. So he had to book a flight to Paris in another airline and another to London. The airline advised that Mij should be packed in a box. The author put Mij into it the box an hour before he started for the airport so that Mij would become accustomed to it. Then the author went for a meal. When he returned there was silence in the box. He noticed blood from the air holes. He at once opened it. He found Mij troubled and covered with blood. Mij had torn the inner lining of the box. It was just ten minutes to the flight and the airport was five miles away. So the author put it back in the box and hurried to the airport. The car driver drove very fact.

9. Describe the author’s experience with the otter in the aircraft.

Answer: When the author reached the airport, the aircraft was wailing to take off. He rushed in. He covered the place new his scat with newspaper. lie gave the parcel of fish to the air hostess for the otter. She cooperated with the author and advised him to keep the pet on his knee. But soon Mij was out of the box. He disappeared very soon. Suddenly, there was chaos in the plane. There were squawks and shrieks all around. A woman cried, “A rat, a rat!” The author saw the otter beneath the legs of an Indian. When he tried to catch the otter, His face got covered in curry. The air hostess assured him that she would find the otter. The author returned to his seat. After some time, the otter came to him and sat in his lap.

10. Why did Maxwell decide to have an otter as a pet? How did he get it?

Answer: Maxwell’s pet dog Jonnie died. He felt alone without a pet. This time he decided to change his pet. He decided to own an otter as his pet. His place, Camusfearna was ringed by water. It would be a suitable place for this new experiment. One of his friends suggested that he could get an otter in the Tigris marshes.

Otters were as common in the Tigris marshes as were mosquitoes. They were often tamed by the Arabs as pets. Maxwell got his mail after five days. He carried it to his bedroom to read. There he found two Arabs squatting on the floor. A sack lay beside them. There was something moving and twisting in it. The Arabs handed him a note from his friend. It read, “Here is your otter …” The sack was opened. And there emerged a unique creature from the sack. Later on, this otter was named Mijbil by Maxwell.

11. Why was Mijbil, the otter was christened Maxwell’s otter by zoologists? How did the otter behave in the beginning and afterwards?

Answer: The otter. Mijbil was, in fact, of a race previously unknown to science. At last, it was christened Lutrogale perspicillata maxwelli by zoologists. It was also called Maxwell’s otter after the name of its master.

In the beginning, Mijbil was neither hostile or friendly. He was totally aloof and indifferent. He chose to sleep on the floor as far from Maxwell’s bed as possible. But the change started coming from the second night. He came on to his bed and remained asleep in the crook of his knees. He began to lose his indifference and apathy. He started taking a keen interest in his surroundings. Later on, he became playful and started enjoying his stay with his owner.

12. What is a characteristic of otters? How did Mijbil enjoy himself by playing different games?

Answer: Maxwell learnt that extending and spreading every drop of water about the place is the main characteristic of otters. And Mijbil was no exception. He went wild with joy in the water. He continued rolling and plunging in the bathtub. He made enough slosh and splash for a hippo. A bowl must be overturned. Water must be kept on the move until it overflows. Mijbil enjoyed himself doing funny things. He would stand up on the end of the bathtub and turn the tap to its full flow. He spent hours shuffling a rubber ball around the room like a four-footed soccer player. He would lie on his back juggling with small objects between his paws. He enjoyed playing with marbles which were his favourite toys for this pastime.

13. How was Mijbil transported from Basra to London? What scenes did the otter create in the aircraft?

Answer: Transporting Mijbil from Basra to London was really a problem. The British airline would not fly animals. Maxwell had to book a flight to Paris on another airline. According to the instructions, Mijbil was put into a box not more than eighteen inches square. Luckily, the seat booked for him was at the extreme front. He covered the floor around his feet with newspapers. The air hostess was very friendly and cooperative. Maxwell gave her a parcel of fish for Mij to be kept in a cool place. She suggested that he should keep his pet on his knee.

The moment the box was opened, Mij was out in a flash. He disappeared at high speed down the aircraft. The noisy scene was created. There were squawks and shrieks all around. A woman stood up from her seat crying. “A rat!A rat!” Maxwell saw Mijbil disappearing beneath the legs of a portly turbaned Indian. The air hostess requested Maxwell to resume his scat. She hoped to find the animal and bring it to him. Suddenly, he heard Mijbil’s voice from his feet. Mijbil bounded on to his knee and began to nuzzle the face and neck of his owner.

14. What were strange and funny wild guesses that Londoners made about Mijbil? Who made the best remark about the otter?

Answer: It was rather difficult for an average Londoner to recognise such a strange animal as an otter. Most of them had never seen such a unique animal. The thing that surprised Maxwell that Londoners made such funny and wild guesses about Mijbil, the otter. He faced a continuous barrage of questions from the anxious but ignorant people. They made random guesses about the animal. Some of them guessed that he was ‘a baby seal’ or ‘a squirrel’ or ‘a walrus’. Others also made fantastic guesses. One called Mijbil ‘a beaver’. Another called it ‘a bear cub’. The third guessed that it was `a leopard’. Mij was anything but an otter.
The question that was awarded the highest score came from a labourer. The surprised labourer spat, glared and growled out, “Here, Mister—what is that supposed to be?”

Extract Based Questions

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow:

Question 1: Two days later, Mijbil escaped from my bedroom as I entered it, and I turned to see his tail disappearing round the bend of the corridor that led to the bathroom. By the time I got there he was up on the end of the bathtub and fumbling at the chromium taps with his paws. I watched, amazed; in less than a minute he had turned the tap far enough to produce a trickle of water, and after a moment or two achieved the full flow.

a. Who was Mijbil?
b. What was the cause of the narrator’s surprise?
c. What do you know about Mijbil?
d. Where did Mijbil go?

Answer:
a. Mijbil was the otter.
b. The narrator was surprised to find otter turning the tap on to play with water.
c. Mijbil was an otter that the narrator had kept as a pet.
d. Mijbil went to the narrator’s bathroom.

Question 2: With the opening of that sack began a phase of my life that has not yet ended, and may, for all I know, not end before I do. It is, in effect, a thraldom to otters, an otter fixation, that I have since found to be shared by most other people, who have ever owned one.

a. Which creature emerged from the sack?
b. With what was the otter coated?
c. What was the new phase of the author’s life?
d. Why was the otter named ‘Maxwell’s otter’?

Answer:
a. An otter emerged from the sack.
b. The otter was coated with symmetrical pointed scales of mud armour.
c. It was a thraldom to otters. It was a strong attachment and feeling for the otter.
d. The otter was of a race previously unknown to science and was at length christened by zoologists as Maxwell’s otter.

Question 3: But the real play of an otter is when he lies on his back and juggles with small objects between his paws. Marbles were Mij’s favourite toys for this pastime: he would lie on his back rolling two or more of them up and down his wide, flat belly without ever dropping one to the floor.

a. What is the real play of an otter?
b. What are Mij’s favourite toys?
c. How did he conduct with them?
d. What do you know about Mij?

Answer:
a. He lies on his back and juggles with small toys between his paws.
b. Marbles are Mij’s favourite toys.
c. He would lie on his back rolling two or more of them up and down his wide, flat belly without ever dropping one to the floor.
d. Mij is an otter that the author had kept as a pet.

Question 4: Early in the New Year of 1956 I travelled to Southern Iraq. By then it had crossed my mind that I should like to keep an otter instead of a dog and that Camusfearna, ringed by water a stone’s throw from its door, would be an eminently suitable spot for this experiment. When I casually mentioned this to a friend, he as casually replied that I had better get one in the Tigris marshes, for there they were as common as mosquitoes, and were often tamed by the Arabs.

a. Where did the narrator go?
b. What did he want as a pet?
c. What ‘experiment’ did Maxwell think Camusfearna would be suitable for?
d. Why did the narrator think of keeping an otter in place of a dog as a pet?

Answer:
a. The narrator went to Southern Iraq.
b. He wanted an otter as a pet.
c. Maxwell thought of buying an otter instead of a dog and thought Camusfearna ringed with water would be suitable for keeping an otter.
d. The narrator’s pet dog had died, he was too sad to think of keeping a dog again.

Question 5: I cabled to England, and when, three days later, nothing had happened, I tried to telephone. The call had to be booked twenty-four hours in advance. On the first day the line was out of order; on the second the exchange was closed for a religious holiday. On the third day, there was another breakdown. My friend left, and I arranged to meet him in a week’s time. Five days later, my mail arrived. I carried it to my bedroom to read, and there, squatting on the floor, were two Arabs; besides them lay a sack that squirmed from time to time. They handed me a note from my friend: “Here is your otter….”

a. What was the main problem in getting the mail?
b. What did the narrator get in the package?
c. What did he see when he entered his room?
d. Why did the sack squirm from time-to-time?

Answer:
a. On the first day, the line was out of order, then exchange was closed for a religious holiday and then another breakdown.
b. The narrator got a pet — an otter.
c. He saw two Arabs with an otter in a sack.
d. The sack squirmed from time-to-time because there was an otter in it.

Question 6: Mijbil, as I called the otter, was, in fact, of a race previously unknown to science, and was at length christened by zoologists Lutrogale perspicillata Maxwell, or Maxwell’s otter. For the first twenty-four hours Mijbil was neither hostile nor friendly; he was simply aloof and indifferent, choosing to sleep on the floor as far from my bed as possible. The second night Mijbil came on to my bed in the small hours and remained asleep in the crook of my knees until the servant brought tea in the morning, and during the day he began to lose his apathy and take a keen, much too keen, interest in his surroundings.

a. ‘Maxwell’s otter’. Why was the otter given this name?
b. What was his behaviour during the first twenty-four hours?
c. What shows that the otter tried to be friendly on the second night?
d. When did Mijbil come to the narrator’s bed?

Answer:
a. The zoologists had christened it as Lutrogale perspicillata Maxwell, or Maxwell’s otter after the narrator as it was of a race previously unknown to science.
b. Otter’s behaviour during the first twenty-four hours was neither friendly nor hostile.
c. He came to the narrator’s bed and slept in the groove of his knees.
d. Mijbil came to the narrator’s bed in the early hours of the morning.

Question 7: The creature that emerged from this sack on the spacious tiled floor of the Consulate bedroom resembled most of all a very small, medievally conceived, dragon. From the head to tip of the tail, he was coated with symmetrical pointed scales of mud armour, between whose tips was visible a soft velvet fur like that of a chocolate-brown mole.

a. Which creature is being talked about here?
b. What did it resemble?
c. Why was he covered with mud?
d. How is the otter described in the above lines?

Answer:
a. Otter.
b. It looked like a small medieval-conceived dragon.
c. He was covered in mud because nobody gave him a bath.
d. The otter has been described as a soft velvet fur like that of a chocolate-brown mole.

Self- Assessment Test

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1: Very soon Mij would follow me without a lead and come to me when I called his name. He spent most of his time in play. He spent hours shuffling a rubber ball around the room like a four-footed soccer player using all four feet to dribble the ball, and he could also throw it, with a powerful flick of the neck, to a surprising height and distance. But the real play of an otter is when he lies on his back and juggles with small objects between his paws. Marbles were Mij’s favourite toys for this pastime: he would lie on his back rolling two or more of them up and down his wide, flat belly without ever dropping one to the floor.

a. How did Mij play with the rubber ball?
b. What is the real play of the otter?
c. How did the otter spend most of his time?
d. What did he look like while playing?

Question 2: When I returned, there was an appalling spectacle. There was complete silence from the box, but from its airholes and chinks around the lid, blood had trickled and dried. I whipped off the lock and tore open the lid, and Mij exhausted and blood-spattered, whimpered and caught at my leg. He had torn the lining of the box to shreds; when I removed the last of it so that there were no cutting edges left, it was just ten minutes until the time of the flight, and the airport was five miles distant. I put the miserable Mij back into the box, holding down the lid with my hand.

a. Why did the narrator call it an appalling spectacle?
b. Why was the narrator nervous?
c. What were the observations of the narrator when he returned?
d. Why did the narrator put Mij back into the box?

Short Answer Questions

1. ‘She was the very queen of her kind’. Explain the reason behind admiration for the air-hostess.
2. What happened when Maxwell opened the box on the plane?
3. How did Maxwell learn of Mijbil’s love for water?
4. When and why did Maxwell think of keeping an otter as a pet?
5. What would Mij do on the low wall adjoining the school opposite to Maxwell’s flat in London?

Long Answer Questions

1. How did the otter look when the author got it? What name did he get it? How did the otter enjoy being in the bathroom?

2. How did the narrator make arrangements for transporting his otter to London?

3. Describe the narrator’s experience with the otter in the aircraft

You cannot copy content of this page