NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Civics Chapter 8 A Shirt in the Market

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science Civics Chapter 8 A Shirt in the Market contains the answers to the exercises given in the NCERT History book. These solutions are easy and accurate that help you to answer the questions asked in the examinations. NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Civics Chapter 8 are prepared by our subject experts in very easy language. Practice these solutions regularly to ensure excellent marks in the exams.

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Social Science Civics Chapter 8

Question 1: What made Swapna sell the cotton to the trader instead of selling at the Kurnool cotton market?

Solution: Swapna had borrowed ₹ 2500 at high interest from the local trader. The amount was borrowed in order to buy seeds, fertilisers and pesticides for cultivation. The other condition which Swapna had to agree to was that she would sell all her cotton to him instead.

Question 2: Describe the conditions of employment as well as the wages of workers in the garment exporting factory. Do you think the workers get a fair deal?

Solution: The conditions of employment and wages of workers in the garment factory can be described as:

Conditions of employment – The conditions of employment at garment exporting factories are deplorable. The factories are unhygienic and congested. The employees are hired on a temporary basis, so they can be fired at anytime. There is an absence of basic facilities for employees.

Wages – Faced with pressures from the buyers, the garment exporting factories, in turn, try to cut costs. They get the maximum work out of the workers at the lowest possible wages. Overall, the workers do not get a fair deal and their employment conditions need to be improved.

Question 3: Think of something common that we use. It could be sugar, tea, milk, pen, paper, pencil, etc. Discuss through what chain of markets this reaches you. Can you think of the people that help in the production or trade?

Solution: The chain of markets for milk production is as follows:

(i) Dairy cooperatives purchase milk from dairy farmers at different locations

(ii) The milk is then transported to the factories run by the dairy cooperatives

(iii) The milk is then pasteurised and packed in containers

(iv) The packed milk containers are then given to traders working with the cooperatives who transport them to locations where wholesale dealers will purchase them

(v) Retailers then purchase the milk from the wholesalers who then sell the packed milk at booths spread across the city

Question 4: Arrange the statements given alongside in the correct order and then fill in the numbers in the cotton bolls accordingly. The first two have already been done for you.

1. Swapna sells the cotton to the trader.
2. Customers buy these shirts in a super market.
3. Trader sells cotton to the Ginning Mill.
4. Garment exporters buy the cloth from merchants for making shirts.
5. Yarn dealers or merchants give the yarn to the weavers.
6. The exporter sells shirts to the business person from the U.S.A.
7. Spinning mill buys the cotton and sells yarn to the yarn dealers.
8. Weavers return with the cloth.
9. Ginning mill cleans the cotton and makes it into bales.

NCERT Solutions for Class 7 Civics Chapter 8 A Shirt in the Market image 1

Solution:
1. Swapna sells the cotton to the trader.
3. Trader sells cotton to the Ginning Mill.
9. Ginning mill cleans the cotton and makes it into bales.
7. Spinning mill buys the cotton and sells yarn to the yarn dealers.
5. Yarn dealers or merchants give the yarn to the weavers.
8. Weavers return with the cloth.
4. Garment exporters buy the cloth from merchants for making shirts.
6. The exporter sells shirts to the business person from the U.S.A.
2. Customers buy these shirts in a super market.

Extra Questions

Very Short Answer Questions

1. What is a weekly market?

Answer: A weekly market is so-called as it is organised only for a day. These are not permanent shops and traders put up their stalls or shops till evening. Almost every day-to-day item is available in these markets at comparatively cheaper rates.

2. What is a mall?

Answer: It is an enclosed shopping space. It usually has a large building with many floors that have shops, restaurants and cinema halls, etc. These shops most often sell branded products.

3. Define wholesale market.

Answer: It refers to buying and selling in large quantities. Most products including vegetables, fruits and flowers are sold in special wholesale markets.

4. What does ‘Chain of Markets’ mean?

Answer: A series of markets that are connected like links in a chain because products pass from one market to another. It is formed starting from wholesale markets to retail shops.

Short Answer Questions

1. What are the unique features of a weekly market?

Answer: (i) A weekly market is so-called as it is held on a specific day of the week.

(ii) They do not have permanent shops. Traders set up shops for the day and then close them up in the evening.

(iii) They may then set up the market at a different place the next day.

(iv) There are thousands of such markets in India where people come for their everyday requirements.

2. Why are weekly markets cheaper than other markets?

Answer: (i) Weekly shops supply cheap products since they do not have permanent buildings. They do not have to pay rent or pay high electricity charges, etc.

(ii) Moreover, most shop owners store things at home and are helped by family members. So, they don’t have to hire workers.

(iii) Further, as there are many sellers of the same product, there is a competition and people are able to bargain.

3. What are shops in the neighbourhood?

Answer: (i) There are many shops in the neighbourhood which sell goods and services.

(ii) We can buy milk from the dairy, grocery from the departmental store, stationery, eatables or medicines from other shops.

(iii) Many of these are permanent shops, while others are roadside stalls like vegetable hawkers, mechanic and fruit vendors, etc.

4. How are shops in the neighbourhood useful?

Answer: (i) Shops in the neighbourhood are useful since they are located at short distances, they are reachable and accessible as and when required.

(ii) Usually, the buyers and sellers are familiar and sometimes, sellers give goods on credit.

5. Write a note on shopping complexes and malls.

Answer: (i) Malls and shopping complexes are the large, multi-storeyed, airconditioned buildings where both branded and non-branded goods are available.

(ii) However, the cost of these goods may not be as cheap as those available in the neighbourhood or weekly markets.

(iii) Purchasing goods from the malls depends upon the affordability of the customers.

Long Answer Questions

1. How is a chain of market formed?

Answer: (i) Goods are manufactured in factories, on farms and in homes.

(ii) The people in between, the producer and the final consumer are the traders.

(iii) The wholesaler traders buy goods in large quantities.

(iv) For instance, the vegetable wholesaler trader will not buy a few kilos of vegetables, but will buy in large quantities such as 25 to 100 kilos.

(v) These goods are then sold to other traders. In these markets, buying and selling take place between traders. It is through these links of traders that goods reach faraway places.

(vi) The trader who finally sells it to the consumer is the retailer.

(vii) There could be a trader in a weekly market, a hawker in the neighbourhood or a shopkeeper in the shopping complex. This is how a chain of market is created.

2. How are weekly markets advantageous?

Answer: (i) Weekly markets are advantageous as products here are cheaper.

(ii) Almost all products such as vegetables, grocery, utensils, etc. are available at one place.

(iii) People do not have to go to different places to buy different products.

(iv) They get a variety and choice of products also.

3. What are branded and non-branded goods and where are they available?

Answer: (i) Both branded and non-branded goods are available in urban markets in shopping complexes and malls.

(ii) Branded goods are expensive, often promoted by advertising and claims of better quality.

(iii) The companies producing these products sell them through local shops in large urban markets and at times through special showrooms.

(iv) As compared to non-branded goods, fewer people can afford to buy branded ones.

Hots (Higher Order Thinking Skills)

1. Explain the dictum of ‘markets everywhere’.

Answer: (i) Buying and selling of goods may not necessarily takes place in a market.

(ii) People can place orders for a variety of things on the phone or the Internet.

(iii) Markets exist at several places we may not be aware of.

(iv) This is because we buy a large number of goods and services that we don’t use directly.

(v) For example, when we buy a TV, a number of things like its screen, body, wires, etc. may have come from elsewhere. But you get the final product, the television, in the shop.

Class 7 Civics Chapter 8 NCERT Questions and Answers

CBSE Solutions for Class 7 Social Science Civics Chapter 8 A Shirt in the Market are given above. All our solutions are updated as per the latest CBSE Syllabus and Guidelines. Download these NCERT solutions for free from our app and use offline.

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